ICJIA releases Overdose Fatality Review Teams Literature Review

States and localities across the United States have implemented overdose fatality review teams to address the impact of the opioid crisis on their communities. Overdose fatality review teams are designed to increase cross-system collaboration among various public safety, public health, and social service agencies; identify missed opportunities and system gaps; and develop recommendations for intervention efforts in hopes of preventing future overdose deaths. However, limitations in peer-reviewed research on the effectiveness of overdose fatality review teams limit the understanding of their usefulness. This article provides a review of literature on overdose fatality review teams, including goals, recommendations, and information sharing protocols, as well as considerations from other fatality review teams.

Here’s the link.

Just released! IDPH Report on Opioid Use during the Covid-19 Pandemic

Illinois is experiencing both an opioid overdose epidemic and the COVID-19 pandemic. The numbers of fatal opioid overdoses have increased since 2019 with treatment and harm reduction services complicated by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The goal of this publication is to provide a brief update on the state of the opioid epidemic in Illinois during the COVID-19 pandemic. The 2020 fatality data are provisional, and numbers may change as cases are reviewed and only available through the third quarter of 2020.

A PDF of this report :

Illinois Opioid Overdose Epidemic during the Covid-19 Pandemic

A link to the IDPH website for this report and more information is here

CPRD research article published: “Opioid use at the transition to emerging adulthood” in Addictive Behaviors

SEOW Members Crystal Reinhart, Doug Smith and others in the School of Social Work at UIUC recently published an article on youth opioid use based on data from the Illinois Youth Survey. Here is the citation and the abstract:

Barton, A., Reinhart, C.A., Campbell, C., Smith, D.C., & Albarracin, D. (2020). Opioid use at the transition to emerging adulthood: A latent class analysis of non-medical use of prescription opioids and heroin use. Addictive Behaviors, 114. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2020.106757

Background: Although rates of nonmedical opioid use are highest in late adolescence and emerging adulthood, efforts to understand the extent of the heterogeneity in opioid misuse during this time have been limited. The current study aimed to derive and define typologies of opioid use in high school students at the onset of emerging adulthood.
Methods: Survey responses from a statewide sample of high school students aged 18 and 19 (N = 26,223) were analyzed. Group-based comparisons between participants reporting opioid use and those not reporting opioid use
were conducted. Among those reporting opioid use (n = 1,636), we conducted a latent class analysis (LCA) to identify heterogeneous subgroups of opioid users on the basis of non-medical use of prescription opioids (NMUPO) and heroin use. The resulting classes were then compared across various risk and protective factors using multinominal logistic regression.
Results: Consistent differences were observed between participants using opioids and participants not using opioids, with moderate to large effect sizes. Results from LCA revealed three subclasses: NMUPO-Any Use, NMUPO To Get High, and Heroin Use. Subclass differences were observed for non-opioid substance use, mental health, and demographics.
Conclusions: Findings from this study underscore the variability of youth who engage in opioid use in late adolescence. Results also indicate that opioid use during adolescence is likely indicative of a broader set of substance use and mental health issues.

CPRD releases 2020 Illinois Youth Survey frequency reports for students in Illinois urban, suburban and rural areas

CPRD has recently released “Strata Reports” that report the frequencies for all variables covered in the Illinois Youth Survey for Illinois youth in 8th, 10th and 12th grades living in urban, suburban and rural areas.  CPRD was unable to produce the strata report for the City of Chicago that is typically released due to an inadequate sample size. CPRD was also unable to produce an overall statewide report also due to sample size limitations resulting from the Covid-19 pandemic.

Review these strata reports here: https://iys.cprd.illinois.edu/results/state

Reported data tables in each strata report are divided into six areas:

  • STUDENT CHARACTERISTICS includes demographic data and other information about the surveyed population.
  • DRUG PREVALENCE AND BEHAVIORS Includes substance use behaviors including type, frequency, consequences, and recovery.
  • DRUG USE CONTRIBUTING FACTORS Includes factors in students, their families, and their communities that may increase or reduce the risk of youth substance use disorder, such as access to substances and parental communication about expectations to not use drugs.
  • INTERPERSONAL CONFLICT, VIOLENCE AND DELINQUENCY includes experiences with violence and high-risk behaviors including bullying, fighting, and gambling.
  • ACADEMIC AND SCHOOL EXPERIENCES includes youth opinions of their academic experiences, their school environment, and engagement in youth activities.
  • MENTAL, SOCIAL, AND PHYSICAL HEALTH includes a variety of mental and physical health issues including thoughts about depression/suicide, nutrition, and physical activity (includes estimates of obesity).

For questions contact scott[at]cprd[dot]illinois[dot]edu

New CPRD Project: Substance Use Disorder Demonstration Evaluation

The Medicaid 1115 Substance Use Disorder Demonstration waiver will introduce a limited piloting of certain services that are currently not directly available to Illinois Medicaid beneficiaries. These additional services are expected to inform the state’s efforts to transform the behavioral health system in Illinois as some beneficiaries will have access to less costly community-based services, which are expected to help beneficiaries improve their health and avoid costlier services provided in an institution.  The demonstration period is July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2023 and includes 10 pilots addressing inpatient treatment, clinically managed withdrawal, case management, peer recovery support, crisis intervention, home visiting, community integration, supported employment, intensive in-home, and respite services. The project has six goals:

  1. Increased rates of identification, initiation, and engagement in treatment;
  2. Increased adherence to and retention in treatment;
  3. Reductions in overdose deaths, particularly those due to opioids;
  4. Reduced utilization of emergency departments and inpatient hospital settings for treatment where the utilization is preventable or medically inappropriate through improved access to other continuum of care services;
  5. Fewer readmissions to the same or higher level of care where the readmission is preventable or medically inappropriate; and
  6. Improved access to care for physical health and behavioral health conditions among beneficiaries.

The Center for Prevention Research and Development (CPRD) will be conducting an overall evaluation of these pilot services using Interrupted Time Series to compare trend data pre- and post-wavier and individual pilot evaluations using Propensity Score Matching analyses to compare groups. The evaluation will be conducted in partnership with the Office of Medicaid Innovation at the University of Illinois and funded by the Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services.

 

2019 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System data tables posted.

This is to announce that the 2019 Illinois Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) detailed data tables were just posted to the IDPH website. This is the fourth year of data collection using the Phase 8 version of the PRAMS survey.

The 2019 results are available by clicking the green “Select a year” button in the middle of the page available at http://dph.illinois.gov/data-statistics/prams.  On the 2019 results landing page, a comprehensive set of charts is provided in the “2019 Illinois PRAMS Detailed Data Tables” link. There also are chart-specific hyperlinks allowing you to see the available charts and to view them individually.

Opioid supplement data collected from April 2019 through December 2019 are included in the results beginning on Table 81. These results replace the opioid results released earlier this year for the period April 2019 through August 2019.

As always, I am interested in your feedback on the data tables. I also am interested in knowing if you use the PRAMS data for education purposes, or for program or policy development that could be highlighted in a Data to Action report to the CDC. Please feel free to e-mail or call with your comments and feedback.

Thank you for your support of the PRAMS program!

Julie

Julie B. Doetsch, M.A.

Perinatal Health Data Manager

Illinois Department of Public Health

525 W. Jefferson St., 2nd Floor

Springfield, IL 62701

217-785-1064 ext. 5

Schedule: M-Th 7:30a–4:30p, Alternating Fridays 7:30a-3:00p / Off

New reports on maternal opioid and marijuana use from IDPH’s PRAMS survey

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) PRAMS project is an ongoing survey of women who recently delivered live born infants in Illinois. PRAMS collects state-level, population-based data on maternal attitudes and experiences before, during, and shortly after pregnancy.

From April to December 2019, a 13-question opioid supplement was added to the PRAMS survey. These results are for those responding during April through August 2019 (n=527) and weighted using the corresponding five-month sampling frame.

In addition, from December 2017 through March 2019, a 12-question marijuana and drug use supplement was added to the PRAMS survey. These results are for the calendar year 2018 births. During 2018, a total of 2,175 recent mothers were sampled and 1,306 completed the PRAMS survey (weighted response rate 61%).

Detailed data tables and charts are available at:
http://dph.illinois.gov/data-statistics/prams/datatables-2018.

2019 Maternal Opioid Use Fact Sheet_12-24-2020

Maternal Marijuana Use Fact Sheet 2018_1-19-2021

Prescription Opioid Misuse and Use of Alcohol and Other Substances Among High School Students — Youth Risk Behavior Survey, United States, 2019

To examine youth substance use trends and patterns, CDC analyzed data from the 2009–2019 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. This report presents estimated prevalence of current (i.e., previous 30-days) marijuana use, prescription opioid misuse, alcohol use, and binge drinking and lifetime prevalence of marijuana, synthetic marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, injection drug use, and prescription opioid misuse among U.S. high school students. Findings highlight opportunities for expanding evidence-based prevention policies, programs, and practices that aim to reduce risk factors and strengthen protective factors related to youth substance use, in conjunction with ongoing initiatives for combating the opioid crisis.

Prescription Opioid Misuse and Use of Alcohol and Other Substances Among High School Students — Youth Risk Behavior Survey, United States, 2019

Vital Signs: Prescription Opioid Pain Reliever Use During Pregnancy — 34 U.S. Jurisdictions, 2019

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention published a study outlining that prescription opioid use during pregnancy has been associated with poor outcomes for mothers and infants. Studies using administrative data have estimated that 14%–22% of women filled a prescription for opioids during pregnancy; however, data on self-reported prescription opioid use during pregnancy are limited.

Vital Signs: Prescription Opioid Pain Reliever Use During Pregnancy — 34 U.S. Jurisdictions, 2019